manželky a groupies

vše o minulosti, přítomnosti a budoucnosti(?) pink floyd

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fernetti
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manželky a groupies

Příspěvekod fernetti » 22.08.2005 13:39:07

tak aby toho nebylo málo, tak tohle vlákno je pro veškeré info o manželkách a láskách pánů gilmoura, waterse, wrighta a masona. kdo má nějakou fotku, kteá by s tímto tématem souvisela, případně nějakou informaci či dokonce pikošku, tak směle s ní sem!
there´s no dark side of the moon, really. matter of fact it´s all pink.

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Příspěvekod fernetti » 22.08.2005 13:50:11

a aby se to tu nějak rozhýbalo, přidávám odkaz na info mé favoritky, kterou je manželka davida gilmoura, polly samson http://www.red-umbrella.co.uk/polly.htm

a zde šťastný páreček:

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there´s no dark side of the moon, really. matter of fact it´s all pink.

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Jana
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Příspěvekod Jana » 22.08.2005 13:53:38

Tak toto jest pokud vim nová manželka (už čtvrtá... :o ) pana Waterse...

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Jmenuje se Laurie Durning (Waters?) a je to filmařka... Víc nevim, taková drbna zase nejsem :lol:

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FleetingGlimpse
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Příspěvekod FleetingGlimpse » 22.08.2005 14:48:38

fernetti píše:a aby se to tu nějak rozhýbalo, přidávám odkaz na info mé favoritky, kterou je manželka davida gilmoura, polly samson http://www.red-umbrella.co.uk/polly.htm

a zde šťastný páreček:


Dave ma vkus 8)
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FleetingGlimpse
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Příspěvekod FleetingGlimpse » 22.08.2005 15:00:34

Roger se svou prvni zenou, Judy Trim

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The sun is the same in a relative way but you're older,
shorter of breath and one day closer to death

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Příspěvekod fernetti » 22.08.2005 15:21:36

FleetingGlimpse píše:Roger se svou prvni zenou, Judy Trim



týjo, kdy spolu byli?
there´s no dark side of the moon, really. matter of fact it´s all pink.

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FleetingGlimpse
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Příspěvekod FleetingGlimpse » 22.08.2005 15:25:43

fernetti píše:
FleetingGlimpse píše:Roger se svou prvni zenou, Judy Trim



týjo, kdy spolu byli?


1969 - 1975
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shorter of breath and one day closer to death

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Jana
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Příspěvekod Jana » 22.08.2005 15:28:05

Už je to hooooodně dávno....... :roll: Něco málo o ní mám ten pocit psali v knížce od Schaffnera. A Roger o ní mluvil v dokumentu o Dark Side SACD, co u nás běžel na ČT2. V souvislosti s Money - jak hodil ty mince do džbánku na hrnčířským kruhu... Nějak tak to bylo :lol:

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Příspěvekod kuba » 22.08.2005 15:52:38

Klasika, manzelky vrstevnicemi jejich dcer :D Jen at si panove na stary kolena uzivaj...

Návštěvník

Příspěvekod Návštěvník » 22.08.2005 17:02:02

kuba píše:Klasika, manzelky vrstevnicemi jejich dcer :D Jen at si panove na stary kolena uzivaj...


...dokud můžou :D :D :D (...jestli ještě vůbec...)

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Příspěvekod fernetti » 23.08.2005 13:41:27

Je to sice trošku delší a v english, ale za přelouskání to stojí (zpoírování z jedné konference o pf):

Another girl like you

The groupie culture influenced the Floyd in subtle ways

by Mike McInnis

Pink Floyd never had much of a reputation as a reckless, wild rock band. Groups like the Rolling Stones, the Who, Led Zeppelin and many other of their contemporaries made "sex, drugs, and rock 'n' roll" legendary, and while the Floyds certainly partook in these to a certain degree, they never became major parts of their public persona. Syd Barrett was, of course, the notable exception. Perhaps his mental collapse--which has been blamed on any number of things, ranging from drugs, schizophrenia, emotional rejection, and various combinations thereof--served as a cautionary tale for the rest of the band, warning them not to get too wrapped up in the excesses of success.

When we think of Barrett's indulgences, drugs (particularly LSD) are usually the first thought. It is easy to forget that Syd was somewhat known for his exploits with groupies and a revolving door of girlfriends. Duggie Fields, Barrett's onetime roommate, is quoted as saying, "I just remember suddenly being surrounded by the Pink Floyd and hundreds of groupies instantly." He also told Floyd biographer Nicholas Schaffner, "Some of the girls were stunning, and they would literally throw themselves at Syd." As Storm Thorgerson put it, "There were always girls around Syd, for as long as I can remember."

Barrett's love life had always been tempestuous, even back in Cambridge. As Barrett cracked, his treatment of the women in his life became increasingly violent. June Bolan remembers Syd's locking up one girlfriend in a room for several days, occasionally slipping some food to her under the door. Thorgerson recalls that Syd's relationship with his Floyd-era girlfriend Lynsey Korner was marked by a series of "horrendous rows", including one in which Barrett pinned her down on the floor and beat her about the head with a mandolin. After breaking it off with Korner, Barrett reportedly had a string of casual girlfriends, and was known to treat them cruelly, locking himself away while they were left pounding on his door. He once picked up a girlfriend named Gilly off a bed and threw her across the room without any provocation. Another story has Syd throwing a bottle of milk at a more serious girlfriend named Gayla Pinion. He ultimately returned to Cambridge with Pinion, and nearly married her, but the fight in which they finally ended the affair was so violent it had to be broken up by neighbors.

This seemingly endless string of violent relationships was no doubt well-known to the rest of the Floyds, even after Barrett was removed from the band. (Gilmour actually lived in an apartment adjacent to Syd and Duggie Fields, and could see into their kitchen from his home.) It is accepted that such behavior was part of the inspiration for Pink's mistreatment of the groupie in The Wall.

The scene that accompanies "Young Lust" in the Wall film was probably inspired as much by the general rock star legend rather than any specific incident between a groupie and Waters or Barrett or any other member of the Floyd. And though such stories have been kept tightly under wraps, there is very little doubt that the Floyds dallied with women on the road. In 1994, Rick Wright told Q Magazine, "In the summer of '68, there were groupies everywhere; they'd come and look after you like a personal maid, do your washing, sleep with you, and leave with a dose of the clap." In Inside Out--more of an exercise in gentlemanly diplomacy than a tell-all affair--Nick Mason admits that both he and Waters engaged in some infidelities while touring, which was naturally met with some disapproval from their wives. And Wright's ex-wife Franka is quoted as saying that David Gilmour had a different girl in several cities across Europe, presumably as recently as the 1987-89 world tours.



Atom Heart Mother (1970)
It was Wright who most famously explored his feelings about groupie relationships in "Summer '68" from Atom Heart Mother. The lyrics show Wright's remorse over such infidelity (he was married to Juliette Gale Wright from 1964 to 1984, a period that obviously included the titular 1968 as well as 1970, when the song was recorded and released).

The first verse impresses upon the listener just how brief and transitory these relationships were--he had only just met the woman "six hours ago", and acknowledges that their parting comes quickly on the heels of their introduction ("We say goodbye before we said hello"). But what is most striking is the speaker's desperation to make some kind of emotional connection with this groupie. The opening lines form a polite invitation: "Would you like to say something before you leave? Perhaps you'd care to state exactly how you feel." The repetitive chorus is even more blunt, and all the more plaintive: "I would like to know... how do you feel?"

Was Wright remorseful for using these women for sex, or did he feel used himself? Was he feeling guilty about seeking solace in the arms of nameless woman after nameless woman, when what he really longed for was emotional contact rather than mere physical companionship? The lack of meaningful communication and connection between the speaker and the woman is quite clear. "Not a single word was said", either as they were meeting, in a room too loud to allow for conversation, or as they parted ways, slinking off after an illicit rendezvous. He shows no real affection for her ("I hardly even like you, I shouldn't even care at all"), and their 'lovemaking' seemed empty, meaningless, rote ("Occasionally you showed a smile, but what was the need?"). He admits that this encounter is just one in a string of similar experiences for both himself ("Tomorrow brings another town, another girl like you") and for her.

Worst of all, the experience leaves the speaker feeling emptier and more alone than he felt before he met the woman. He feels as though he has "lost a bloody year" of his life, feels symbolically cold (isolated, alone) despite the room's warmth, and wishes he was elsewhere, in a happier place with his true friends. Perhaps the most telling line is the last one, in which he states "I've had enough for one day".

[I have chosen to ignore the cryptic lines "Goodbye to you/Charlotte Pringle's due" for several reasons. First, although these are the lyrics printed in the 'official' CD booklet, there is no guarantee that they were transcribed by or approved by Wright himself. (Some hear the lyric as "Charlotte Pringles too", for example, and I've seen several other transcriptions.) Second, the internet abounds with speculation as to who this mysterious Charlotte Pringle was, though the common assumption is that this is the name of a specific groupie. And finally, parsing the lyric isn't entirely straightforward: is it a possessive (i.e. that which is due to Charlotte Pringle), or perhaps a contraction (as in "Charlotte Pringle is due")? Solving this mystery will doubtless shed great light on the misunderstood songwriting genius that is Rick Wright, but until he comes forth with a statement about what he singing, I think I'll leave the guesswork to others.]

One can only imagine what Juliette Gale Wright must have thought about "Summer '68". She had performed with early incarnations of Pink Floyd and had toured with the band, so she would have been well-acquainted the rock 'n' roll culture and the entourage of groupies that apparently followed the Floyd during the Underground days. I assume that she had some knowledge of her husband's dalliances, and perhaps "Summer '68" was Rick's way of purging his guilty conscience, or telling his wife what every jilted woman wants to hear: 'She meant nothing to me'.



Obscured by Clouds (1972)
Now let's turn our attention to Wright's other lyrical statement on the subject of fleeting sexual encounters, "Stay" from Obscured by Clouds. The song is credited to Wright and Waters jointly, though Wright is listed first. It is not known precisely which wrote the lyrics and which wrote the music, or whether it was perhaps a collaborative effort on both counts. The fact that Wright sings the lead vocal suggests that he was the lyricist, as was the group's general M.O. in the late '60s and early '70s. ("Us and Them", however, is a ready example of a song in which Wright sings a Waters lyric set to Wright's music, with writing credit listed the same way). For the purposes of simplicity, I'm assuming that these are basically Wright's lyrics.

"Stay" is often interpreted as a statement on the fleeting nature of romantic relationships, which it certainly is. But the line "Rack my brain and to try to remember your name" tells us that the speaker is without a doubt not well-acquainted with his lady companion. The song simply cannot describe the breakup of a pair of longtime lovers; this is a one-night stand.

Whereas "Summer '68" focuses entirely on the 'morning after', and is something of a snapshot of the moment in which the man and the woman awkwardly part company, "Stay" is a more complete exercise in storytelling. (I like to think of this as being the influence of Roger Waters, who was emerging as the more sophisticated songwriter by the time Obscured by Clouds was recorded.) The first verse represents the seduction, while the second verse represents the awkward moment in which two strangers find themselves waking up together, as described in "Summer '68".

In the first verse, the speaker (presumably the man, though the lyrics are decidedly gender-neutral) opens a bottle of wine and invites his potential partner to "Stay and help [him] to end the day". He turns on the charm, telling her that he wants to get to know her ("I want to find what lies behind those eyes"). Like the speaker in "Summer '68", this man seems to be seeking companionship to ease his loneliness. Perhaps he has learned from earlier escapades that getting to know the woman will make this encounter more satisfying to him on an emotional level.

In the second verse, the man awakes the next morning and is "surprised to find [the woman] by his side". His thoughts are no longer clouded by lust and alcohol, and instead he finds himself viewing her through his "morning eyes". We might surmise that his surprise is a pleasant one--perhaps he is used to having his groupies and other temporary lovers slink off in the middle of the night, and he is glad that this one has stayed with him through the night. But just as his inability to remember the woman's name shows that this is yet another fleeting affair, so does his struggle "to find the words to tell [her] goodbye" suggest that he really just wants to be rid of her. The mood is again awkward and embarrassing, as both are faced with the stark fact that they are simply using one another.

Particularly poetic are the couplets that close each verse. During the seduction phase, the "midnight blue" of the night sky is described as "burning gold", a warm, romantic image in stark contrast to the "yellow moon" that is "growing cold" (harkening back to the 'cold' mentioned in "Summer '68, and foreshadowing the emotional chill between the lovers the next morning). On the following "new born day", that same midnight blue has "turned to grey", indicating that what was once beautiful, warm, and inviting has become dull and lifeless. The color imagery not only clearly defines that period of time in which each verse takes place, but also encapsulates the song's emotional content.

[The final couplet of the second verse also contains the somewhat mysterious phrase "morning dues", as published in the 1995 remaster CD booklet. Perhaps it is better transcribed as "morning dews", thus going along with the idea of the "new born day". But if the word was indeed "dues", that raises some questions. Taken in the context of "Summer '68" and the line about "Charlotte Pringle's due", might we surmise that Wright felt some obligation toward the groupies he slept with? Did he feel that they were 'due' some measure of respect and polite hospitality? Was there an unwritten code that groupies were 'paid' for their services with a little kindness and consideration afterwards? Was this the part of the encounter that Wright found the most uncomfortable? Again, I don't want to engage in too much speculation, but it is certainly something to think about.]

Both "Stay" and "Summer '68" are easily-overlooked songs by an easily-overlooked member of the band on easily-overlooked albums, but they stand up to close scrutiny. It took a lot of courage for Rick Wright to have put such a delicate subject on display in this way. His frankness and honesty reveals a side of the world of "sex, drugs, and rock 'n' roll" that most bands would never explore on record.

Mike McInnis is a staff writer for Spare Bricks.
there´s no dark side of the moon, really. matter of fact it´s all pink.

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the Dark Lord
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Příspěvekod the Dark Lord » 23.08.2005 13:50:16

Opravdu trochu delší.

Přelouskněte to někdo za nás (a pro nás) všechny,
já už překládám dva články.
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fernetti
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Příspěvekod fernetti » 23.08.2005 14:07:03

ovšem toto je mazec:

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tipnul bych to na 30.6., kdy byli spolu roger a david viděni na jakémsi čochu (jednu fotku z tama jsem už viděl, ale chyběla tam rogova současná polovička)
there´s no dark side of the moon, really. matter of fact it´s all pink.

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Jana
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Příspěvekod Jana » 23.08.2005 14:09:41

fernetti píše:ovšem toto je mazec:
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Tak ta se vyvedla :D

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Příspěvekod Jend » 24.08.2005 8:42:10

Polly Samsonovaá pomáhala skládat texty na The Division Bell... Nemám pravdu...?


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